Welcome to the new Schneider Electric Community

It's your place to connect with experts and peers, get continuous support, and share knowledge.

  • Explore the new navigation for even easier access to your community.
  • Bookmark and use our new, easy-to-remember address (community.se.com).
  • Get ready for more content and an improved experience.

Contact SchneiderCommunity.Support@se.com if you have any questions.

Close
Invite a Co-worker
Send a co-worker an invite to the Exchange portal.Just enter their email address and we’ll connect them to register. After joining, they will belong to the same company.
Send Invite Cancel
84708members
354091posts

Event Logging Memory Assessment Tool

Remote Operations Forum

Collaborate and share knowledge on the extensive range of remote systems and devices, including SCADA radios and RTUs, on the Schneider Electric Exchange Remote Operations (formerly SCADA & Telemetry) forum. From commissioning SCADA integration devices and software, to enhancing existing installations or troubleshooting, connect with a global community of experts and users. Subscribe today.

Solved
AlastairF
Lieutenant Lieutenant
Lieutenant
0 Likes
1
910

Event Logging Memory Assessment Tool

Does anyone have a (spreadsheet) tool that can provide an assessment of the projected/ use of data capacity for a system?

There is information in the Help around "SCADAPack x7x Hardware manual> Specifications" and more information in "SCADAPack Operations Technical Reference > SCADAPack x70 Memory Capacity > Object Database and Event Pool Memory > Object Database memory" but I was interested in a tool that could assist in determining rate of event memory consumption, particularly where comms to a RTU was interrupted for a period thus preventing data/ event upload to the SCADA.

 

Tags (1)

Accepted Solutions
BevanWeiss
Spock
Spock

Re: Event Logging Memory Assessment Tool

Isn't the calculation simply a division?

 

i.e. if you configure 'Maximum Event Storage' as 40,000, and you have 4 events per second... then you can run without overflow for up to 10,000 seconds.

If you have 100 events per second, then you can run without overflow for up to 400 seconds.

 

If you want a spreadsheet that tells you how many events per second you're going to be generating, then that's impossible.  It will depend on what you're doing.  How often you run the pump, how often the level / flow / cat counter changes...

 

You could pin it as a 'worst-case'... say 10 events per second... which seems like a pretty active system.  That will allow for 4,000 seconds, or just under 1 hour.

 

If you have the Maximum Event Storage set to a smaller number, like 5000, then that will allow proportionally less time before event overflow.

 

I always like to set this to a really high value.  BUT... you need to consider how much of your bandwidth this may potentially take up once network comms are restored.  If you have 40000 events, then this will be several MEGABYTES of network traffic... which on a shoe-string radio network might cause problems... and re-transmits etc will only make the network traffic burden increase.


Lead Control Systems Engineer for Alliance Automation (VIC).
All opinions are my own and do not represent the opinions or policies of my employer, or of my cat..

See Answer In Context

Tags (1)
1 Reply 1
BevanWeiss
Spock
Spock

Re: Event Logging Memory Assessment Tool

Isn't the calculation simply a division?

 

i.e. if you configure 'Maximum Event Storage' as 40,000, and you have 4 events per second... then you can run without overflow for up to 10,000 seconds.

If you have 100 events per second, then you can run without overflow for up to 400 seconds.

 

If you want a spreadsheet that tells you how many events per second you're going to be generating, then that's impossible.  It will depend on what you're doing.  How often you run the pump, how often the level / flow / cat counter changes...

 

You could pin it as a 'worst-case'... say 10 events per second... which seems like a pretty active system.  That will allow for 4,000 seconds, or just under 1 hour.

 

If you have the Maximum Event Storage set to a smaller number, like 5000, then that will allow proportionally less time before event overflow.

 

I always like to set this to a really high value.  BUT... you need to consider how much of your bandwidth this may potentially take up once network comms are restored.  If you have 40000 events, then this will be several MEGABYTES of network traffic... which on a shoe-string radio network might cause problems... and re-transmits etc will only make the network traffic burden increase.


Lead Control Systems Engineer for Alliance Automation (VIC).
All opinions are my own and do not represent the opinions or policies of my employer, or of my cat..
Tags (1)