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[Imported] How to get Alarm limits on a Mimic faceplate ?

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sbeadle
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[Imported] How to get Alarm limits on a Mimic faceplate ?

>>Message imported from previous forum - Category:General Items<<
User: KylePaynter123, originally posted: 2018-12-12 17:02:09 Id:337
Hi guys

I created a new faceplate for a mimic that suppose to show the alarm limits for that mimic when it is clicked by a user, however I'm not sure how to put those limits on the faceplate.
So far it just show the name of the mimic when clicked


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sbeadle
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Re: [Imported] How to get Alarm limits on a Mimic faceplate ?

>>Responses imported from previous forum


Reply From User: tfranklin, posted: 2018-12-13 13:49:25
Assuming this is a global faceplate I'd recommend looking up indirect animations in the help file. If you search for indirect(s) in this forum you'll find a good bit of discussion about when to use and not to use them, and faceplates are about the only place I personally advocate using them.

In short -- you'll configure the mimic to accept the fullname of a point. Each text box or object that you want to animate on that faceplate would then be driven off of the parameter you pass in + some indirectly accessed attribute.


Reply From User: KylePaynter123, posted: 2018-12-13 18:14:42
Thank you !

I will start by reading up on indirect Animations [at]tfranklin thanks again


Reply From User: KylePaynter123, posted: 2018-12-20 13:20:03
Guys good morning,

It was a relatively simple fix (I simply renamed the mimic's description ) as it already had all the info needed.

I'm glad I went through the issues as I now have a better understand with regard to layers and mimics

 


Reply From User: BevanWeiss, posted: 2019-01-03 21:14:31
[at]tfranklin said:
Assuming this is a global faceplate I'd recommend looking up indirect animations in the help file. If you search for indirect(s) in this forum you'll find a good bit of discussion about when to use and not to use them, and faceplates are about the only place I personally advocate using them.

In short -- you'll configure the mimic to accept the fullname of a point. Each text box or object that you want to animate on that faceplate would then be driven off of the parameter you pass in + some indirectly accessed attribute.

'Global faceplates' sound like a bad idea if you would need to use an indirect animation for it. The performance of indirect animations is very bad, and their usage should be avoided where possible. If you need a faceplate for a number of items, then the faceplate should be stored within a template, with each instance of it an instance of the template. This means you can avoid the use of indirect variables.


Reply From User: tfranklin, posted: 2019-01-03 21:24:16
[at]BevanWeiss said:
'Global faceplates' sound like a bad idea if you would need to use an indirect animation for it. The performance of indirect animations is very bad, and their usage should be avoided where possible. If you need a faceplate for a number of items, then the faceplate should be stored within a template, with each instance of it an instance of the template. This means you can avoid the use of indirect variables.

What I mean by a global faceplate is when using a single mimic with no embedded mimics on it for things like editing alarm limits of a point. A single mimic that I'd pass a fullname to which animates alarm conditions, allows changes, then the uses closes the mimic. Everything would be text boxes with an animated value. In this example everything is tied to the same point, but there are a number of OPC properties being brought in for that point.

If you were to do the same thing without the use indirect animations (ex: at a template level) then you'd have to create a mimic for each point that you need to change limits on, which is not maintainable.

The only alternative I can think of for something like this would be to use a scripted form. I suppose it all depends on the use case.

See Answer In Context

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sbeadle
Janeway Janeway
Janeway
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356

Re: [Imported] How to get Alarm limits on a Mimic faceplate ?

>>Responses imported from previous forum


Reply From User: tfranklin, posted: 2018-12-13 13:49:25
Assuming this is a global faceplate I'd recommend looking up indirect animations in the help file. If you search for indirect(s) in this forum you'll find a good bit of discussion about when to use and not to use them, and faceplates are about the only place I personally advocate using them.

In short -- you'll configure the mimic to accept the fullname of a point. Each text box or object that you want to animate on that faceplate would then be driven off of the parameter you pass in + some indirectly accessed attribute.


Reply From User: KylePaynter123, posted: 2018-12-13 18:14:42
Thank you !

I will start by reading up on indirect Animations [at]tfranklin thanks again


Reply From User: KylePaynter123, posted: 2018-12-20 13:20:03
Guys good morning,

It was a relatively simple fix (I simply renamed the mimic's description ) as it already had all the info needed.

I'm glad I went through the issues as I now have a better understand with regard to layers and mimics

 


Reply From User: BevanWeiss, posted: 2019-01-03 21:14:31
[at]tfranklin said:
Assuming this is a global faceplate I'd recommend looking up indirect animations in the help file. If you search for indirect(s) in this forum you'll find a good bit of discussion about when to use and not to use them, and faceplates are about the only place I personally advocate using them.

In short -- you'll configure the mimic to accept the fullname of a point. Each text box or object that you want to animate on that faceplate would then be driven off of the parameter you pass in + some indirectly accessed attribute.

'Global faceplates' sound like a bad idea if you would need to use an indirect animation for it. The performance of indirect animations is very bad, and their usage should be avoided where possible. If you need a faceplate for a number of items, then the faceplate should be stored within a template, with each instance of it an instance of the template. This means you can avoid the use of indirect variables.


Reply From User: tfranklin, posted: 2019-01-03 21:24:16
[at]BevanWeiss said:
'Global faceplates' sound like a bad idea if you would need to use an indirect animation for it. The performance of indirect animations is very bad, and their usage should be avoided where possible. If you need a faceplate for a number of items, then the faceplate should be stored within a template, with each instance of it an instance of the template. This means you can avoid the use of indirect variables.

What I mean by a global faceplate is when using a single mimic with no embedded mimics on it for things like editing alarm limits of a point. A single mimic that I'd pass a fullname to which animates alarm conditions, allows changes, then the uses closes the mimic. Everything would be text boxes with an animated value. In this example everything is tied to the same point, but there are a number of OPC properties being brought in for that point.

If you were to do the same thing without the use indirect animations (ex: at a template level) then you'd have to create a mimic for each point that you need to change limits on, which is not maintainable.

The only alternative I can think of for something like this would be to use a scripted form. I suppose it all depends on the use case.