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Is the UTS10BI right for my application?

APC UPS for Home and Office Forum

Schneider Electric support forum for our APC offers including Home Office UPS, Surge Protectors, UTS, software and services and associated products designed to share knowledge, installation, and configuration.

Solved
whp_apc
Crewman
Crewman
0 Likes
2
136

Is the UTS10BI right for my application?

This was originally posted on APC forums on 11/23/2011


I just purchased a Honda EU6500is generator to provide critical backup during power outages such as we've experienced recently here in NJ.

My house is all electric:

1/2 HP well pump 240V (Running: 6amps , LRA/C: 23amps)
40 gallon HW heater 4500W
16 cu ft. refrigerator 5.5 running amps
Kitchen Aid convection oven 1440W
Electric range: 8" burner
Compact fluorescent lights
Computer 480W PSU
21-inch monitor
APC Smart 700 UPS
HP LaserJet 2100
Etc.

Obviously, I could never power all of these loads at the same time; however, I would like to manage them preferably through the UTS10BI with ALM (shedding) or, if not possible, manually through the use of a service panel Interlock kit.

I understand that the UTS10BI cannot handle more than one 240V load through Circuits #9 and #10. So, I thought about wiring the well pump, HW heater, and electric range to Circuits #9 and #10 and then install “manual” switches between the HW heater, electric range, and well pump to manually disconnect them from the above-referenced circuits. Doing so would allow me to connect them as needed with only one on Circuits #9 and #10 at a given time.

My greatest concern is that the 20amp fuse of Circuits #9 and #10 might not even handle the loads individually!

My question as I stated above, could I wire the well pump, the HW heater, and the electric range into Circuits #9 and #10 and only have one connected at a given time? I would prefer to leave the well pump “manual” switch set to “ON” and only turn off the well pump when I needed to provide power to either the HW heater or range.

Also, I would like the refrigerator (120V) to run most of the time and the well pump (240V) as needed with the UTS10BI handling these two automatically. It's the Locked Rotor Amps/Current that concerns me. If the refrigerator and the well pump happen to turn on at the same time would the inrush current (LRA/C) be too much for the generator/UTS to handle?

I've been told by those supposedly informed that the well pump and refrigerator should not cause any problem for the generator or the UTS10BI, but I'm concerned that the UTS10BI might refuse to provide power given a 20amp fuse on Circuits #9 and #10. In addition, the well pump is on a 30amp breaker as is the HW heater.

The well pump installer told me the 30amp breaker was more for convenience and that the pump motor would never draw anywhere near that amount of current (running 6amps; inrush 23amps). If the 30amp breaker is not required, could I replace with a 20amp breaker? Similarly, is the HW heater out of the question, since I believe it requires a 30amp breaker, or am I incorrect?

I would be most appreciative if senior members et al. would help me decide which path to take: UTS10BI or an Interlock kit. If I have to manually manage the loads, I would prefer an Interlock kit over a manual transfer switch, because I could use the breakers in the service panel to control all house circuits, of course being mindful not to overload any.

whp

Message was edited by: whp


Accepted Solutions
whp_apc
Crewman
Crewman
0 Likes
0
136

Is the UTS10BI right for my application?

This was originally posted on APC forums on 11/23/2011


I just purchased a Honda EU6500is generator to provide critical backup during power outages such as we've experienced recently here in NJ.

My house is all electric:

1/2 HP well pump 240V (Running: 6amps , LRA/C: 23amps)
40 gallon HW heater 4500W
16 cu ft. refrigerator 5.5 running amps
Kitchen Aid convection oven 1440W
Electric range: 8" burner
Compact fluorescent lights
Computer 480W PSU
21-inch monitor
APC Smart 700 UPS
HP LaserJet 2100
Etc.

Obviously, I could never power all of these loads at the same time; however, I would like to manage them preferably through the UTS10BI with ALM (shedding) or, if not possible, manually through the use of a service panel Interlock kit.

I understand that the UTS10BI cannot handle more than one 240V load through Circuits #9 and #10. So, I thought about wiring the well pump, HW heater, and electric range to Circuits #9 and #10 and then install “manual” switches between the HW heater, electric range, and well pump to manually disconnect them from the above-referenced circuits. Doing so would allow me to connect them as needed with only one on Circuits #9 and #10 at a given time.

My greatest concern is that the 20amp fuse of Circuits #9 and #10 might not even handle the loads individually!

My question as I stated above, could I wire the well pump, the HW heater, and the electric range into Circuits #9 and #10 and only have one connected at a given time? I would prefer to leave the well pump “manual” switch set to “ON” and only turn off the well pump when I needed to provide power to either the HW heater or range.

Also, I would like the refrigerator (120V) to run most of the time and the well pump (240V) as needed with the UTS10BI handling these two automatically. It's the Locked Rotor Amps/Current that concerns me. If the refrigerator and the well pump happen to turn on at the same time would the inrush current (LRA/C) be too much for the generator/UTS to handle?

I've been told by those supposedly informed that the well pump and refrigerator should not cause any problem for the generator or the UTS10BI, but I'm concerned that the UTS10BI might refuse to provide power given a 20amp fuse on Circuits #9 and #10. In addition, the well pump is on a 30amp breaker as is the HW heater.

The well pump installer told me the 30amp breaker was more for convenience and that the pump motor would never draw anywhere near that amount of current (running 6amps; inrush 23amps). If the 30amp breaker is not required, could I replace with a 20amp breaker? Similarly, is the HW heater out of the question, since I believe it requires a 30amp breaker, or am I incorrect?

I would be most appreciative if senior members et al. would help me decide which path to take: UTS10BI or an Interlock kit. If I have to manually manage the loads, I would prefer an Interlock kit over a manual transfer switch, because I could use the breakers in the service panel to control all house circuits, of course being mindful not to overload any.

whp

Message was edited by: whp

See Answer In Context

2 Replies 2
vidyaguy_apc
Cadet
0 Likes
0
136

Re: Is the UTS10BI right for my application?

This was originally posted on APC forums on 11/25/2011


You wrote, "I understand that the UTS10BI cannot handle more than one 240V load through Circuits #9 and #10." It is my impression, however, (APC User Manual for the UTS10B1, page 1-3, "Supporting 240V circuits") that "multiple 240V loads can be wired to that 240V circuit if required."

Have I misunderstood?

whp_apc
Crewman
Crewman
0 Likes
0
137

Is the UTS10BI right for my application?

This was originally posted on APC forums on 11/23/2011


I just purchased a Honda EU6500is generator to provide critical backup during power outages such as we've experienced recently here in NJ.

My house is all electric:

1/2 HP well pump 240V (Running: 6amps , LRA/C: 23amps)
40 gallon HW heater 4500W
16 cu ft. refrigerator 5.5 running amps
Kitchen Aid convection oven 1440W
Electric range: 8" burner
Compact fluorescent lights
Computer 480W PSU
21-inch monitor
APC Smart 700 UPS
HP LaserJet 2100
Etc.

Obviously, I could never power all of these loads at the same time; however, I would like to manage them preferably through the UTS10BI with ALM (shedding) or, if not possible, manually through the use of a service panel Interlock kit.

I understand that the UTS10BI cannot handle more than one 240V load through Circuits #9 and #10. So, I thought about wiring the well pump, HW heater, and electric range to Circuits #9 and #10 and then install “manual” switches between the HW heater, electric range, and well pump to manually disconnect them from the above-referenced circuits. Doing so would allow me to connect them as needed with only one on Circuits #9 and #10 at a given time.

My greatest concern is that the 20amp fuse of Circuits #9 and #10 might not even handle the loads individually!

My question as I stated above, could I wire the well pump, the HW heater, and the electric range into Circuits #9 and #10 and only have one connected at a given time? I would prefer to leave the well pump “manual” switch set to “ON” and only turn off the well pump when I needed to provide power to either the HW heater or range.

Also, I would like the refrigerator (120V) to run most of the time and the well pump (240V) as needed with the UTS10BI handling these two automatically. It's the Locked Rotor Amps/Current that concerns me. If the refrigerator and the well pump happen to turn on at the same time would the inrush current (LRA/C) be too much for the generator/UTS to handle?

I've been told by those supposedly informed that the well pump and refrigerator should not cause any problem for the generator or the UTS10BI, but I'm concerned that the UTS10BI might refuse to provide power given a 20amp fuse on Circuits #9 and #10. In addition, the well pump is on a 30amp breaker as is the HW heater.

The well pump installer told me the 30amp breaker was more for convenience and that the pump motor would never draw anywhere near that amount of current (running 6amps; inrush 23amps). If the 30amp breaker is not required, could I replace with a 20amp breaker? Similarly, is the HW heater out of the question, since I believe it requires a 30amp breaker, or am I incorrect?

I would be most appreciative if senior members et al. would help me decide which path to take: UTS10BI or an Interlock kit. If I have to manually manage the loads, I would prefer an Interlock kit over a manual transfer switch, because I could use the breakers in the service panel to control all house circuits, of course being mindful not to overload any.

whp

Message was edited by: whp